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August 15, 2016


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SPOTLIGHT ON SUCCESS

Healthy Fun Fair Returns with Free Medical Services and Fun

Healthy Fun Fair Returns with Free Medical Services and Fun

American National University’s Pikeville Campus hosted the 9th Annual Healthy Fun Fair on campus on Thursday, July 28.  As always, the event saw a large crowd from the surrounding community who came to enjoy free health screenings and services, free drinks and hot dogs, and lots of fun for all ages.

Though thunderstorms threatened for much of the day and briefly showered the campus around noon, an estimated 500 to 600 people attended.  Once again local first responders, including EMT & paramedic students from the campus’s newest career programs, put on a dramatic demonstration of their skills for the assembled crowd.  After a simulated tornado, ANU students—under the watchful eyes of their instructors—utilized the “jaws of life” to remove a vehicle roof, allowing access to “victims” trapped inside.  Other ANU students acted as “victims” for the demonstration as a triage area was set up and “injured” participants were treated and prepared for transport.

“Participants are allowed the opportunity to educate themselves about their health needs in a fun, relaxed environment while the students are offered the experience of professional interaction with local healthcare leaders.”

Not one but two medevac helicopters (Air Evac Lifeteam and Wings Air Rescue) paid a visit, landing next to the campus parking lot.  East Kentucky After Hours Clinic, assisted by ANU nursing students, provided free school physicals.  Other organizations that provided services, screening, and information included Cooley Medical, Shake Senora Zumba, Pikeville Police Department, Kentucky Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement, University of Kentucky Extension Service, Coal Run Police Department, Wal-Mart/SAM’s Club Vision Center, Carl D. Perkins Job Corps, Judi’s Place, Appalachian Pregnancy Care Center, Pike County Health Department, Pike County Office of the Blind, Scholar House, Highlands Lab, and Pikeville Medical Center.

“Healthy Fun Fair provides a valuable service to both the community and our students,” said Pikeville Campus director Tammy Riley. “Participants are allowed the opportunity to educate themselves about their health needs in a fun, relaxed environment while the students are offered the experience of professional interaction with local healthcare leaders.”

The Pikeville Healthy Fun Fair has evolved to become the university’s signature community event, and each year attracts dozens of volunteers and contributions from the community.  Planning has already started for next year’s event on July 27, 2017.  See y’all there!

Photo A-ANU EMT & paramedic students operate the “jaws of life.”

Photo B-ANU nursing students conduct a school physical.

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Indiana
Fort Wayne, IN
Indianapolis, IN
South Bend, IN

Kentucky
Danville, KY
Florence, KY
Lexington, KY
Louisville, KY
Pikeville, KY
Richmond, KY

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Akron Area, OH
Cleveland, OH
Cincinnati, OH
Columbus, OH
Dayton Area, OH
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Youngstown, OH

Tennessee
Bartlett, TN
Bristol, TN
Knoxville, TN
Madison, TN
Memphis, TN
Nashville, TN

Virginia
Charlottesville, VA
Danville, VA
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Roanoke Valley, VA

West Virginia
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NASHVILLE
Campus Serves as New Site for Adult Education and HiSET Testing

Campus Serves as New Site for Adult Education and HiSET Testing

The National College Nashville Campus is now serving as a site for adult education classes and the Tennessee High School Equivalency Test (HiSET®), which are offered through Workforce Essentials.

Workforce Essentials manages the Middle Tennessee Regional District Adult Education Programs in 13 counties through funding by a grant from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.  The primary classes offered are Tennessee High School Equivalency (HSE) Diploma prep courses, which prepare students to take the Tennessee High School Equivalency Test (HiSET®).

The classes are designed for adults to learn at their own pace, guided by classroom teachers who are trained to teach adults.  Classes are offered during the day and evening at various times to accommodate adult students’ schedules and they are completely free.

“Once these students have earned their High School Equivalency diploma, we hope that they'll keep moving forward in their education and their careers.”

Workforce Essentials serves the over 118,000 residents in the Middle Tennessee Region District without a high school diploma.  There are almost 55,000 individuals in Davidson County alone without a HSE.

“We are very pleased to partner with Workforce Essentials to offer the adult education classes and HiSET® testing here at National College,” said ANU Nashville Campus director Debra Tolladay. “Once these students have earned their High School Equivalency diploma, we hope that they’ll keep moving forward in their education and their careers.”

For more information or to schedule an appointment to attend an orientation session, call Workforce Essentials at (615) 761-6073, or contact the National College Nashville Campus at (615) 333-3344.

Photo-Some members of the Workforce Essentials staff (from left to right) Kathryn Bonecutter, assistant district coordinator; Sherry Barnhart, lead instructor; Amy Richards, lead instructor; and Jennifer Kleinschmit, student coordinator; are pictured at the National College Nashville Campus with campus director Debra Tolladay.


FLORENCE
Graduate Finds a Degree of Difference at ANU

Graduate Finds a Degree of Difference at ANU

Felicia Taylor tried attending college a couple of different times, but couldn’t find the program that was right for her until she enrolled in the medical assisting program at the American National University Florence Campus. “I was a single mom with three kids. I couldn’t keep bouncing from job to job; I had to have a career,” recalled Felicia. “I decided now or never, and now it was.”  

At ANU, Felicia found that she could quickly complete her training and get started in her medical career. She loved the small class size that she found at ANU and the personal attention that she received from her instructors.

“Ultimately, my goal is to be a NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) nurse, but nursing school would have demanded too much for the situation that I was in, so I wanted to go ahead and get started in the medical field. Medical assisting was the route that I decided to take,” she explained. “I did my homework. I checked out a few different schools…and [ANU] is accredited; [ANU] allows for life credit; allows for testing out without there being a cost to the student; and [ANU does] everything in its power to empower students. A lot of other programs don’t do that.”

“I love the fact that this gives me the advantage to go one on one with patients and make a difference in their day and in their lives.”

Those valuable advantages helped Felicia achieve career success. While recently participating in the Florence Campus commencement ceremony, she explained that she found employoment in the last term of her program when she was hired from her externship at UC Health Advanced Heart Failure Clinic. She also is proud to have passed the certification exam to become a registered medical assistant (RMA), a valuable credential sought after by many medical practices.

“I love the fact that this gives me the advantage to go one on one with patients and make a difference in their day and in their lives,” Felicia said of her new degree and new career. “My life is getting bigger and better every day.”

Photo A-Felicia Taylor is working at UC Health Advanced Heart Failure Clinic where she was hired from her externship during her medical assisting program at the ANU Florence Campus.

Photo B-Felicia is pictured accepting the E. M. Coulter Award from director of health science education Kathreen Buckner during the Florence Campus commencement ceremony that was held in June.


YOUNGSTOWN
Leading Pharmaceutical Services Company Partners with Pharmacy Technician Program

Leading Pharmaceutical Services Company Partners with Pharmacy Technician Program

RX Institutional Services (RXIS) was recently recognized for its support of the ANU Youngstown Campus’s pharmacy technician program

RXIS, a division of Hometown Pharmacy Solutions (HPS), was established in 2007. It provides pharmaceutical services to assisted living, personal care, group homes and skilled nursing facilities throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. RXIS is a leader in pharmacy services, offering E-Prescribing and state of the art systems to improve workflow and med-pass times.

Because of the types of services provided, and the need to employ experienced and educated pharmacy techs, RXIS became a partner with ANU.  This has proved to be a winning situation for both RXIS and our ANU students. In the last several years, RXIS has taken on six ANU externs and has hired three of them.

“In the last several years, RXIS has taken on six ANU externs and has hired three of them.”

Because of the support that RXIS has provided to ANU students and graduates, it was presented with the ANU Distinguished Community Employer Award.  The award was created to show our appreciation to organizations and business that support our philosophy of educating students and developing them into productive employees.

The campus would particularly like to thank Ron McDermott, HPS senior VP of pharmacy operations, and Doug Christy, RXIS director of pharmacy, for their continued support of ANU and our pharmacy technician students. The support of employers like RXIS is vital to the successful training of career college students as they seek to gain the skills they need to serve their community.

Photo-(left to right)  Rose Kratz, ANU campus director; Ron McDermott, HPS senior VP of pharmacy operations; Doug Christie, RXIS director of pharmacy; and Kevin Chakos, ANU Northeast Ohio Region pharmacy program director, are pictured during the Distinguished Community Employer Award presentation.


PRINCETON
Students Awarded Scholarships

 Students Awarded Scholarships

On August 1, Jimmy Welch, executive director of The Credit Bureau of the Virginias Foundation Inc., was at the ANU Princeton Campus to present students Gregory Meadows and Destiny Muncy with $1,000 scholarships.

Both Gregory and Destiny are medical assisting students at ANU. Gregory has been with ANU since 2015 and will graduate in January of next year.  Destiny enrolled at ANU in January and will graduate in 2017.

Gregory told Mr. Welch how happy he was to be at ANU and how much ANU means to him. “By being able to go back to school and get the education that I am getting, it will change my life by not having to worry about getting a good job to support me and my daughter,” Gregory said. “I have always wanted to work in the medical field, and now I am learning the skills to help me succeed in what I want to do.”

“It will change my life by not having to worry about getting a good job to support me and my daughter.”

Recipients of The Credit Bureau of the Virginias Foundation Scholarship must have a 2.0 or above grade point average to be considered. For more information about applying for the scholarship, contact your student services representative.

Photo-ANU medical assisting students Gregory Meadows (far left) and Destiny Muncy (far right) are pictured with Jimmy Welch, executive director of The Credit Bureau of the Virginias Foundatin,  and ANU student services representative Patricia Mitchem during the scholarship award presentation.


LOUISVILLE
Battle of the Classes Puts Knowledge Into Action

 Battle of the Classes Puts Knowledge Into Action

Students from the medical programs at the ANU Louisville Campus recently had an opportunity to pit their skills against those of their fellow students during the “Battle of the Classes.”  During the event, students performed skits which put the knowledge that they’ve gained in the classroom into action.

Students from the Medical Law and Ethics Class acted out a fatal car crash scenario in which photos of the deceased were shared by the media, resulting in a lawsuit and subsequent trial.  Pharmacy technician students demonstrated their knowledge of using an EpiPen as they used it during a mock medical emergency caused by a bee sting.

The Non-Invasive Clinical Class also performed a skit which portrayed a diabetic patient’s visit to a local medical office. During the skit, students demonstrated the patient’s triage by a medical assistant, and then shared nutrition advice from her nurse practitioner. 

“I liked participating because it helps to increase [our skills].”

Bonnie Kiefer, director of health science education at the Louisville Campus, said that students are assigned a project early in the term and the skits include the information that they’ve learned while completing their project. She hopes to hold a “Battle of the Classes” every term and to possibly include skits from the business and general education classes in the future, as well.

“I liked participating because it helps to increase [our skills],” said Jaimini Patel, a medical assisting student who portrayed the patient in the Non-Invasive Clinical Class skit.

While the Medical Law and Ethics Class's skit was selected as the best in "The Battle of the Classes," everyone who participated won a prize--an invitation to a chili supper hosted by Bonnie.

Photo-Medical assisting student Alyssa Gatewood is pictured taking the temperature of student Jaimini Patel during the Non-Invasive Clinical Class’s “Battle of the Classes” skit at the ANU Louisville Campus.


ROANOKE VALLEY
Racing to the MBA Finish Line

Racing to the MBA Finish Line

The MBA students from the ANU Roanoke Valley Campus recently took a break from the traditional classroom and took to the road. Students boarded a bus and headed for the mountains, the Smoky Mountains to be exact. The group was treated to a day of fun at Dollywood and a stay in Pigeon Forge, TN. The amusement park excitement and hotel relaxation was just the first day of the trip. There was much more! On Day Two, the itinerary focused on the educational portion of the excursion. Students spent the day learning all about the operations and business of NASCAR. Students toured the Bristol Motor Speedway and had a speedway consultant explain the facility’s operations and the financial boom of the racing industry.

Some of the interesting facts that students learned about the speedway included:
- The speedway hosts events 334 days out of the year!
- The speedway has seating for 170,000 people but parking for only about 12,000 cars!
- The speedway has more drag racing activities than any other racing events.

“We had so much fun; where do we go next?”

The most amazing fact is probably that the speedway has 180 beautiful, well-appointed suites for sponsors and even the public. Students were able to spend the afternoon in one of the more extravagant suites; the suite belonging to Burton Smith. Smith is the master mind behind the NASCAR industry today. He is the promoter and current owner/CEO of NASCAR’s Speedway Motorsports Inc.  Not only was the suite luxurious, the entire trip was a gift of luxury! In all, the visit was perfect for a summer field trip to explore business in the fast-paced world of racing as students study to make it to the MBA Finish Line!

The students must have enjoyed the trip. When asked if they had fun, the group responded in unison, “We had so much fun; where do we go next?”    

Photo-Students from the MBA program at the ANU Roanoke Valley Campus are pictured in front of the Dollywood sign.  


 
The National News is a biweekly publication designed to share the success and academic accomplishments of students and graduates from American National University and National College. For more information, contact the Communications Department.

In accordance with the regulations of the Tennessee Higher Education Council, all references to "American National University" refer to "National College" in the state of Tennessee.