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October 26, 2015


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SPOTLIGHT ON SUCCESS

The Joseph E. Hurn Scholarship: Investing in Our Students' Futures

The Joseph E. Hurn Scholarship: Investing in Our Students' Futures

American National University believes it is important to honor students for their hard work and commitment to their education – especially as many of our students work a full-time job and lead busy lives in addition to their coursework. Choosing to go back to school and staying dedicated to your education is no small feat. It often means making sacrifices, working hard every day, and staying up late at night to excel in your studies as you prepare for the next step in your career. In recognition and support of the hard work of our students who are committed to achieving academic excellence, American National University is introducing the Joseph E. Hurn Scholarship.

Joseph E. Hurn served as chairman of American National University from 1962 to 1984. He believed in National’s mission of providing students with a strong academic foundation that would help them succeed in their careers. Based on academic merit alone, the Joseph E. Hurn Scholarship is awarded to students who meet certain cumulative grade point average (CGPA) minimums after completing one academic year at American National University (see chart for more information).

We recognize our students are investing in their future by pursuing a degree at ANU, and we are proud to invest in their futures as a community.

The scholarship is available at differing amounts for students pursuing any level of degree - associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s, whether they are attending school part-time (at a minimum of 8 credits or more per term) or full-time (minimum of 12 credits per term). Students remain eligible for this scholarship for up to three terms, provided that they continue to meet the CGPA requirements and do not withdraw from the university.

At American National University, we recognize our students are investing in their future by pursuing a degree at ANU, and we are proud to invest in their futures as a community. The Joseph E. Hurn scholarship is one of several scholarships funded by American National University aimed at helping students afford this key investment into their future. Talk to a student services representative today to find out ways that American National University can help you as you invest in your next career step!

Joseph E. Hurn Scholarship

 

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DANVILLE, VIRGINIA
Surgical Technology Program Receives National Recognition

Surgical Technology Program Receives National Recognition

American National University’s Danville, Virginia Campus recently received a certificate of merit from the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) for achieving a 100% pass rate on the Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) examination. All students and graduates of the campus’s surgical technology program who took the CST exam between Aug. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2015 successfully passed it and received their certification. “The recognition from the NBSTSA for our 100% pass rate is an outstanding way to see achievement in the program,” said surgical technology program director Jennifer Allen. “I would like to give recognition to my surgical technology graduates and students, because they are an intricate part of the program and its success.”

Randi Lee is one of those Danville, Virginia Campus graduates who received her CST certification this year. She has always been interested in the medical field, having worked in various health care facilities since graduating from high school. When she and her husband moved to Virginia from Delaware a few years ago, she took it as an opportunity to train for a more specialized career in the medial field and began researching local surgical technology programs. American National University was the top return on her Google search, and after visiting the campus, touring the surgical technology lab, and meeting the friendly faculty and staff members, she decided it was the right place for her.

Fast forward nearly two years later, and Randi has graduated from her program, having earned an associate’s degree, as well as certification as a surgical technologist (CST). After completing her externship at UNC Chapel Hill’s ambulatory center during her last term of the program, she was hired right away by Person Memorial Hospital in Roxboro, North Carolina.

Randi is now enjoying the day-to-day responsibilities of her new career, which include sterilizing the operating room and setting up equipment before surgeries, tasks which require exceptional accuracy and attention to detail. “It’s rewarding; it’s patient care on a completely different level,” Randi said of her job as a surgical technologist. “You’re there when the patient goes to sleep, you’re there with the patient during surgery, and you’re there when the patient wakes up.”

“It's rewarding; it's patient care on a completely different level.”

She is happy that she’s able to help people and enjoys the thrill of working under high pressure situations. “You never stop learning. There’s always something new every day,” Randi explained of what she enjoys most about her job. “Even if you’ve done the same procedure week after week after week, you’re still learning something new every time you walk into the OR. I like that—it keeps you on your toes.”

A- Randi Lee graduated this year from the Danville, Virginia Campus’s surgical technology program as a Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) and was immediately hired by Person Memorial Hospital.

B- The Danville, Virginia Campus received a certificate of merit from the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting, acknowledging the campus’s 100% pass rate on the CST exam.


MADISON
Graduate Fights for Veterans’ Rights in the Tennessee Legislature

Graduate Fights for Veterans’ Rights in the Tennessee Legislature

Garry Thomas transferred from a state college to enroll in the business administration- management and computerized office applications degree programs at National College’s Madison Campus after meeting an admissions representative at an event he attended in 2007. As a student, Garry was very active on campus and started the Student Veterans Association, a veteran-run student organization, to provide support to veterans enrolled at National College.

“The business degree helped me to organize my veterans’ foundation and network within the Tennessee Legislature for various veteran organizations.”

His externship as the assistant to the Select Committee for Veteran Affairs with the Tennessee Senate allowed Garry the opportunity to help veterans throughout the state of Tennessee. As an extern, Garry was awarded some of the highest honors for interns, including the Senate Joint Resolution and a Tennessee state flag which had been flown over the state capitol.

After graduating, Garry remained very active within the Tennessee Legislature, becoming the only veteran non-legislator sitting on the Veteran Caucus of the State Senate. As such, he fights for the rights of veterans statewide and proudly represents National College. Recently, Garry formed an organization called the Unknown Soldiers, which provides assistance to help veterans and their immediate families meet their employment, personal, and health needs.

Garry continues to visit the Madison Campus as a guest speaker for various business classes, sharing from his experiences and encouraging students to start a business and become active in their local government. “I truly enjoyed my experience at National College so much,” he stated. “The faculty and staff were always very helpful. The business degree helped me to organize my veterans’ foundation and network within the Tennessee Legislature for various veteran organizations.”

 A- Veteran and National College graduate Garry Thomas has carried his passion for veterans’ rights from the Madison Campus all the way to the Tennessee State Legislature.

B- Garry is the only veteran non-legislator sitting on the Veteran Caucus of the Tennessee State Senate.


ROANOKE VALLEY
Religion and Politics: Is There a Connection?

Religion and Politics: Is There a Connection?

Students in Dr. Annette Chamberlin’s video-conferencing Political Science class recently had an opportunity to ask the hard questions about how politics and religion are connected. Along with students in Louisville, KY, students from the Danville, Harrisonburg, and Roanoke Valley, VA campuses were honored to have Reverend Kelvin Edwards join the class to discuss the history of religion and politics in the United States.

Rev. Edwards currently serves the Halesford United Methodist Church at Smith Mountain Lake, VA and the New Hope United Methodist Church in Chamblisburg, VA. He is also currently working on his Master of Theology degree at Lexington Theological Seminary in Kentucky.   

“To move forward with our society, it is essential to try and figure out the role played by government and religions in America today.”

The students were excited to ask their questions about the relationship between politics and religion. The discussion helped them gain a deeper appreciation for the difficulty we face as a nation as we try to bridge the multitude of religions we have in the country. They also learned about how various beliefs shape or are shaped by political views. “To move forward with our society, it is essential to try and figure out the role played by government and religions in America today,” remarked student David Petersen.   

Reverend Kelvin Edwards (center) spoke to Annette Chamberlin’s (left) Political Science class, which spans four ANU campuses, about the connection between politics and religion, with the assistance of video-conferencing proctor Kathy Garrison (right).


DANVILLE, KENTUCKY
Graduate Transitions to New Area and New Career with the Help of ANU

Graduate Transitions to New Area and New Career with the Help of ANU

Shianna Johnson first enrolled at the ANU Richmond Campus to get the training that she needed to help her transition from working two jobs into a better paying career. After a few obstacles temporarily sidetracked her education and she relocated to the Danville area, Shianna was able to pick right back up where she’d left off in her medical assisting program at the ANU Danville, Kentucky Campus. 

“I always knew that I wanted to help people,” Shianna stated regarding her decision to train for the medical field. “When I went to a doctor’s office they never really made me nervous; it always interested me.”

“We're more comfortable now. We know that we're prepared for life.”

As a student at ANU, Shianna particularly enjoyed all of the hands-on procedures that she practiced in her clinical classes, including blood draws, EKGs, and blood pressure readings, and her instructors were always there by her side to help. “They’re laid back and they’re fun to be around, but they also make sure you know what [you should],”she explained.

In the last term of her program, Shianna was placed in an externship in a primary care clinic, where she assisted the doctors and worked in the lab, as well as at the front desk. She was hired by the clinic after demonstrating the skills that she developed at ANU. “On my third week there, they told me that I was hired. I was excited that I didn’t have to go back to retail,” she recalled. “It’s definitely going to change my life, as far as not having to go back to a minimum wage job, and being able to support my growing family. We’re more comfortable now. We know that we’re prepared for life.”

Graduate Shianna Johnson was hired at her externship site after demonstrating the skills she acquired in her medical assisting program at ANU.


RICHMOND
Campus Partnership with Kentucky Career Center is Beneficial to All

Campus Partnership with Kentucky Career Center is Beneficial to All

The American National University Richmond Campus recently named the Kentucky Career Center as a Distinguished Community Employer in recognition of its ongoing support of career college education. For over five years, ANU has partnered with the Kentucky Career Center to place federal work study students at the agency to provide administrative support to its staff.  The partnership is a win-win for both the Kentucky Career Center and the work study students, as the job helps to fund the students’ education as they gain valuable on-the-job experience in a professional atmosphere. 

The work study opportunity can also lead to employment, as it did for ANU graduate Denise Jones, who first came to  the Kentucky Career Center as a federal work study student and is now employed there as the Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) for the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training.

“I can't say enough about the interns we get from American National University because they require less training, and they are very outgoing and hard working.”

Jana Reed, operations manager of the Kentucky Career Center, feels that the ANU work study students that she has supervised have displayed excellent workplace etiquette and soft skills.  “We are thrilled,” Reed said. “I can’t say enough about the interns we get from American National University because they require less training, and they are very outgoing and hard working. One reason so many of these interns excel at the career center is they are open to feedback because they want to grow and learn as much as they can before they enter the workforce, and we love that.”

Business administration-management student Tiffany McKinley, who is the current ANU work study student at the Kentucky Career Center, said she was formerly employed at a day care center, so the administrative experience that she’s gaining has been invaluable. “I love it here.  The people are amazing,” she said. “It’s a blessing from God. It really is.”

A- (Left to right) ANU career center director Cynthia Hansel, federal work study student Tiffany McKinely, Kentucky Career Center staff members Donna Winkler, Jana Reed, and Brian Gustafson, and Richmond Campus director Keeley Gadd participated in the Distinguished Community Employer Award presentation.

B- Business administration-management student Tiffany McKinley said that she appreciates all of the administrative experience that she’s gaining while working as a federal work study student on loan to the Kentucky Career Center.


PRINCETON
Pediatric Patients Brighten Graduate's Day

Pediatric Patients Brighten Graduate's Day

Lakan Newman, a recent graduate of the Princeton Campus, has been hired as a medical assistant at Munif Pediatrics where her patients brighten each and every day. “I really love pediatrics,” Lakan said. “The kids—they have such a way of getting to you and warming your heart. They make you laugh.”

Lakan was hired from her externship at Munif, and she’s called upon the skills that she developed in her program at ANU from the very beginning. “Pretty much, I was completely one hundred percent in the role from day one,” she recalled. “I feel confident that I know exactly what I need to know, because we had such wonderful instruction and such a wonderful staff [at ANU]. 

“Not only do I have my education, I'm helping other people better themselves and their lives.”

Before coming to ANU, Lakan spent a short time at a community college. “I just really didn’t enjoy my time there,” she explained. “I felt like it wasn’t small and intimate enough. Whenever I had a question, I always felt like I was a hindrance. I was new to college, so I kind of needed some support—that made it hard to not have any.”

Lakan found the one-on-one instruction that she was looking for at ANU, and she feels appreciative of the sense of fulfillment and security that her education and her new career have brought to her life. “Education is something that no one can ever take away from you,” she stated. “I’m educated. I’ve accomplished something. Even more so, with medical assisting, I’m using that to put my handprint on the world—to help people out and help them live a healthier lifestyle. That’s a double whammy! Not only do I have my education, I’m helping other people better themselves and their lives.”  

A- Princeton Campus graduate Lakan Newman was hired from her externship at Munif Pediatrics after confidently using the skills that she gained in her medical assisting program from day one.

B- Lakan found the support that she was looking for as a student at ANU.


LEXINGTON
Student and Family Make a Courageous Career Decision

Student and Family Make a Courageous Career Decision

The term ‘courage’ describes the quality of mind or spirit which allows us to face challenges bravely. This term certainly applies to Lexington Campus student Will Barnard, as he pursues a new career in surgical technology after leaving a very successful career in the manufacturing sector.

Will began his career in manufacturing after high school, and his job performance led to promotions and financial security for his family. However, as time passed, Will had a nagging feeling that there was something else out there for him. “I didn’t hate my job. The work was enjoyable and it provided a great living and security for my family,” he shared. “But I knew there was something else, something better.”

As a self-proclaimed perfectionist, Will and his wife agreed that he should look for a career that would match his attention to detail. “I have zero background in the medical field, but when we saw the surgical technology program, we both knew we were onto something,” Will recounted. “We checked out ANU, and here I am in my first term! Surgical technology is a perfect ‘fit’ for me. My perfectionism fits, my desire to help people fits – I could not be happier.”

“My family is my support team – and everyone here at ANU is my family away from home.”

The courage to change one’s career and life is not just relegated to the student, but it also must come from their family members and support system. Leaving an established career and embarking on an entirely new career path is a testament to the commitment and courage Will and his family possess.

He is also appreciative of the welcoming environment he has found at the Lexington Campus, which helped ease the transition. “I love it here at ANU. Everyone is invested in my success and my future,” Will stated enthusiastically. “My family is my support team – and everyone here at ANU is my family away from home. I have absolutely made the correct decision – in my new career and in my choice of school!” 

With the support of his family, Will Barnard left an established career in manufacturing to embark on a new career as a surgical technologist.


PIKEVILLE
Leap of Faith Leads to New Career

Leap of Faith Leads to New Career

When Charlie Meuth was last featured in the National News (read his story here), he had taken a leap of faith and moved across the country after accepting a friend’s offer to provide him with a place to live while he earned his nursing degree at the Pikeville Campus. “It was the most grown-up decision that I’ve ever made in my life and the best thing that I could have done for myself,” he stated as he reflected on the last two years.

After graduating from ANU and becoming licensed as an RN, Charlie was recently hired to work on the cardiac wing of Pikeville Medical Center (PMC), where he had performed his clinical rotations. “It’s life-changing for me,” he said of his new career which has brought him both financial stability and personal fulfillment. “It’s just something that I’ve enjoyed doing. The patient interaction that I get being on a floor works out for me.”

“It was the most grown-up decision that I've ever made in my life and the best thing that I could have done for myself.”

Charlie has found that the ANU nursing program is well-respected by the medical professionals at PMC, as well as by his patients. “This school, as far as nursing goes, has a very good name,” he explained. “Patients will tell you.”

His ultimate goal is to one day work in oncology, and he’d also like to continue his education and earn his bachelor’s degree in nursing. But for now, Charlie’s enjoying putting the solid foundation of knowledge and skills that he gained at ANU to work. “Any education you get, they can’t take it away from you,” he shared.

Charlie Meuth has been hired to work on the cardiac wing of Pikeville Medical Center after moving to Pikeville to earn his degree in the ANU nursing program.
 


ALL CAMPUSES
Campuses Celebrate Medical Assisting Week

Campuses Celebrate Medical Assisting Week

The third week in  October has been designated “Medical Assisting Recognition Week” by the American Association of Medical Assistants, and many of the ANU and National College campuses held special events to spotlight their medical assisting students and the career field.

“Medical assistants have become such an important part of the medical field and our medical assisting students work very hard.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical assisting is one of the nation’s fastest growing occupations. Medical assistants work primarily in doctors’ offices and clinics where they are often the primary point of contact for patients as they take vitals, give injections, draw blood, perform scheduling and insurance verifications, and much more.

Faculty, staff, and students at the Bartlett Campus celebrated with lots of spirit, as they designated a different theme for each day of the week. At the ANU Louisville Campus, medical assisting students also participated in a variety of activities throughout the week, including a panel discussion featuring medical assisting graduates and an open house and reception.

“Medical assistants have become such an important part of the medical field and our medical assisting students work very hard, so it was wonderful to be able to recognize them and their upcoming careers during Medical Assisting Week,” said Bonnie Kiefer, director of health science education at the Louisville Campus. 

A- Medical assisting students at the Louisville Campus gathered for a photo during Medical Assisting Week, which highlighted the career field.

B- Bartlett Campus director Larry Smith (left) and director of health science education Ashley Stinson wore matching scrubs for Twins Day, as part of the campus’s celebration of Medical Assisting Week.


 
The National News is a biweekly publication designed to share the success and academic accomplishments of students and graduates from American National University and National College. For more information, contact the Communications Department.

In accordance with the regulations of the Tennessee Higher Education Council, all references to "American National University" refer to "National College" in the state of Tennessee.