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October 12, 2015


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SPOTLIGHT ON SUCCESS

Graduate Builds Two Successful Careers on MBA Foundation

Graduate Builds Two Successful Careers on MBA Foundation

Jack Hatfield earned his Master of Business Administration degree from American National University’s Roanoke Valley Campus in 2010, graduating with honors. Since then, he has successfully established himself in the health insurance industry. After relocating to Tampa, Florida, he created and managed a call center team of more than 60 insurance agents, producing over $40 million a year. Jack then moved on to another company, where he was named the top producing health insurance agent in the state during his first full year with them. He has since been asked to assist in various projects to help grow the company globally.

While his career in insurance is going well, he was motivated to additionally pursue a new, completely different venture. “I decided I wanted to diversify my income in this crazy economy we have had and decided to utilize my famous last name and family history,” shared Jack, who is a direct descendant of the famous Hatfield family patriarch. 

During his time as an MBA student at ANU, Jack had found a drawer full of family recipes while helping his grandmother clean her house and turned them into a homemade cookbook for her as a Christmas gift. After seeing how well it turned out, Jack’s keen business intuition told him this could become something much more, so he decided to have a professional version published and called it “Eat’n with the Hatfields.” In addition to the recipes, he added sections on the Hatfield & McCoy family feud history, interesting family facts, and more.

Jack didn’t want to stop with just the cookbook, so he created a logo and brand with his surname and hopes to license the “Hatfield Approved” logo on items such as hunting and camping equipment. “I created HatfieldBrand.com to sell not only the historical family cookbook, but also Hatfield branded items with the logo,” he explained. “The cookbook is what I am using to pivot the brand into the market at a faster rate. I have on the first page of the cookbook an advertisement drawing traffic to the website. When someone buys the book on Amazon, Kindle, or in bookstores, this will allow me to keep in touch with the Hatfield fans and offer them other great items.”

“My education from ANU has given me the confidence to master anything I want to accomplish in life.”

Jack is thankful for the knowledge and skills gained in his MBA courses, which have added to his success in his insurance career, as well as allowing him to create a business of his own. “My education from ANU has given me the confidence to master anything I want to accomplish in life,” he declared.

A- MBA graduate Jack Hatfield utilized the skills from his business courses at ANU to establish himself in the insurance industry and to start a business venture of his own.

B- Jack’s unique family history served as the inspiration for his “Hatfield Brand.”

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West Virginia
Parkersburg, WV
Princeton, WV

PRINCETON
Career Fair Connects Community Employers with Job Seekers

Career Fair Connects Community Employers with Job Seekers

The Princeton Campus hosted a career fair on Wednesday, Sept. 9. Students, graduates, and area residents seeking employment brought their updated résumés in anticipation of finding valuable careers. Employers from Princeton Community Hospital, WVVA TV, West Virginia Department of Corrections (Beckley, WV), Workforce WV, First Community Bank, WV Army National Guard, and more, greeted job searchers as they paused at each booth to discuss potential employment opportunities.

“I love talking with ANU medical assisting graduates; they have such an extensive skills set,” said Janet Horne, recruiter for Princeton Community Hospital and a regular attendee at area career fairs. “As well as qualifying for medical assistant positions, they are also qualified for a variety of other positions, such as monitor technician, registration specialist, surgical technician, and phlebotomist.” Medical assisting student Holly Kadar stopped by the hospital’s booth to discuss the program with Ms. Horne and was excited to learn she could apply for many more positions than she realized. “My discussion with Janet was extremely informative,” said Holly. “I am delighted to learn the ANU program I have chosen can open so many career opportunities for me.”

A number of students and graduates, as well as area job seekers, indicated they found job opportunities at the career fair that were of interest to them, while employers seemed confident they had found suitable candidates for their job openings.

“I am delighted to learn the ANU program I have chosen can open so many career opportunities for me.”

A – Student Holly Kadar was excited to learn she could apply for a variety of positions at the career fair with her medical assisting training.

B- Princeton Community Hospital recruiter Janet Horn enjoys attending ANU career fairs to find prospective employees.


LYNCHBURG
Students Hear Importance of Both U.S. and Family Histories

Students Hear Importance of Both U.S. and Family Histories

On Sept. 17, the Lynchburg Campus celebrated Constitution Day by welcoming two guests from the community to speak at a campus ceremony. Students, faculty, and staff gathered to hear Penny Swisher, regent for the James River Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Bernard Baker, president of the Dan River Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, discuss the history of the U.S. Constitution and the individuals involved in its creation.

“Our personal freedoms are attributed to our ancestors and what they fought for,” Mr. Baker stated. Ms. Swisher shared from her experience earlier that very morning speaking at a naturalization ceremony held at Poplar Forest, Thomas Jefferson’s home in Forest, Virginia, and explained the impact the Constitution still has today.

“Our personal freedoms are attributed to our ancestors and what they fought for.”

In addition to explaining what the U.S. Constitution meant for the country, the speakers also spent some time discussing what it meant on an individual level. They encouraged those in attendance to explore their own ancestries and family histories. “Government is of the people, but most importantly, family and ancestry are a pivotal piece of the puzzle,” said campus director Bill Baker. “That is why it was a distinct pleasure to have these two speakers talk with our students today. If the acknowledgement of one day serves to connect our students to their history, this is all worth it.”

Pharmacy technician student Kameron Carr was inspired by the Constitution Day program to pursue that connection. “I was absolutely overtaken by the amount of information the speakers provided,” he shared. “It made me want to research my own ancestry.”

(L to R) Student Kameron Carr, campus director Bill Baker, guest speakers Penny Swisher and Bernard Baker, and students Theresa Justis, Autumn Henschel, and Catherine Camden participated in the Constitution Day ceremony.


LEXINGTON
Surgical Technology Students Are Eager For Their Final Challenge

Surgical Technology Students Are Eager For Their Final Challenge

One of the hallmark events in a surgical technology student’s training is successfully arriving at their externship. The externship is the final phase of the program, during which the student is assigned to a hospital or medical facility to get hands-on practice participating in actual surgeries. The fact that Lexington Campus surgical technology students Della Ford, Desiree Taulbee, and Edwin Leniger have reached this point in their training is a testament to their dedication, commitment, and fierce determination to achieve their educational and career goals. They are shining examples of what can be achieved when you completely commit yourself to your future.

“This has prepared me for my dream career and everyone here at American National has helped all of us in so many ways. I am ready to do this!”

“This is what I’ve trained for. I love working with the actual surgical cases more than anything! Everyone here at ANU has helped this become a reality,” Edwin enthusiastically stated.

With the majority of their classroom work finished, they are now ready to use their skills in an actual surgical environment. “I’m so excited about my externship next term,” said Della. “This program is extremely challenging, but our instructors are fantastic and they have made this so interesting and doable.”

“This has prepared me for my dream career and everyone here at American National has helped all of us in so many ways. I am ready to do this!” added Desiree.

“I am very proud of Desiree, Edwin, and Della; their confidence and enthusiasm are palpable,” commented director of surgical technology Regina Shumard. “They have become well-trained, dedicated, confident professionals with tremendous careers ahead. This is what my job is all about.”

(Left to right) Surgical technology students Edwin Leniger, Desiree Taulbee, and Della Ford are prepared for their externships thanks to the guidance of Regina Shumard (far right), director of surgical technology at the Lexington Campus.


MARTINSVILLE
Campus Observes Constitution Day

Campus Observes Constitution Day

The Martinsville Campus celebrated Constitution Day on Sept. 17 with recognition ceremonies for both day and evening students. Campus director John Scott spoke to the assembled students, faculty, and staff about the development of the Constitution and described the framework of government it established. He then quizzed the students in attendance on their knowledge of the court system and challenged them to identify Virginia’s Senators.

Assistant Martinsville City Manager Wayne Knox came to the campus to speak to the evening students. He focused on the significance of the Constitution and how it has survived time and enabled the United States to have a stable legal and political existence. “It is a living, breathing document,” Mr. Knox remarked.  He then spoke on the importance of the amendments added to provide voter rights, and he emphasized that the right to vote is precious because it allows the citizens to make changes in leadership and the political system.

“[The U.S. Constitution] is a living, breathing document.”

A discussion began about remarks made by 2016 presidential candidates, and Mr. Knox added that we as voters will have our say in the 2016 presidential election. Mr. Knox concluded his remarks by explaining how the U. S. Constitution has been used by other developing nations as a model in drafting their constitution.

Constitution Day guest speaker Wayne Knox, assistant Martinsville city manager, encouraged students to exercise their right to vote.


RICHMOND
Graduate Puts Business Concepts to Work Managing Local Store

Graduate Puts Business Concepts to Work Managing Local Store

Using the skills that she developed in her business administration management program, Richmond Campus graduate Rebekah Watts has advanced from bartender to manager of the Hog Trough Bar and Liquor Store.

Rebekah’s accounting and computer skills that she gained at ANU have been essential to the day-to-day operations of the business, where her duties include working with the Point of Sale (POS) system, reconciling the cash drawer, and keeping inventory of stock and placing orders.  She feels grateful to her instructors at ANU, who gave her the one-on-one attention that she needed to grasp the management concepts that she learned. “[Accounting instructor Eric] Vogler always made it fun,” she recalled. “I just liked the teachers and the way that they taught. They told of some of their life experiences to help you with the lesson that you had at the time.”

“I just liked the teachers and the way that they taught. They told of some of their life experiences to help you with the lesson that you had at the time.”

As a recent graduate, Rebekah is thankful that, despite work and family obligations, she persevered to complete her program, which has given her a foundation of knowledge about the business world and brought her more financial stability. “Your goals are a lot clearer once you get through it,” she explained. “When you’re older it’s always hard, because you’ve got a whole [separate] life that you’ve got to do, but once you take the time and push through it, it’s great.”

Rebekah Watts found that the personal attention she received in her classes at the Richmond Campus helped her to master the accounting and computer technology skills that she uses in her job managing a local bar and liquor store.


MADISON
Christina Lockwood -- Administrative Assistant -- Difference Maker

Christina Lockwood -- Administrative Assistant -- Difference Maker

Difference Maker Christina Lockwood has been the administrative assistant at the Madison Campus of National College since 2014. She has over fifteen years of experience working as an office manager and executive administrative assistant in multi-million dollar companies.

“Because of National College, our students are finding careers they love and giving their families a chance for a better future.”

“I enjoy being an administrative assistant because I like creating order. It is extremely satisfying to be useful. I have helped students with projects, fixed schedules, been a cheerleader, and offered support. Mostly, I hope the students know that I am here for whatever they need and that I am in their corner.”

“I have so much respect for our students at National College. These students have made the decision to take an active role in making their life better. They balance working full time, taking care of children, AND coming to school.”

“The best thing about being part of the National College staff is knowing that what you're doing makes a measurable difference in peoples' lives. Because of National College, our students are finding careers they love and giving their families a chance for a better future.”


PIKEVILLE
Paramedic Program Showcased during Open House Event

Paramedic Program Showcased during Open House Event

American National University’s Pikeville Campus held an open house event on Tuesday, Oct. 6, welcoming emergency services professionals and community members to the campus to celebrate their new paramedic program. During the open house, guests enjoyed a BBQ dinner, and paramedic program director Cyrus Hess offered tours of the new paramedic lab, as well as demonstrations with all the new equipment. Community partners Trans-Star Ambulance Service, Air Evac, Pike County Emergency Management, and Wings Air Rescue all attended the event and were able to meet the first class of paramedic students to enter into the program.

“We're all really excited to start the program, especially in such a welcoming and friendly environment.”

Beginning this term, the Pikeville Campus is offering both an emergency medical technician (EMT) diploma program and a paramedic associate’s degree program. The programs include hands-on training in the paramedic lab at ANU, as well as ride-time with local EMT professionals. Graduates of the diploma program will be qualified to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians’ (NREMT) EMT examination, while graduates of the associate’s program will be prepared to take the NREMT’s certification exam to become a National Registry Paramedic (NRP).

“We’re all really excited to start the program, especially in such a welcoming and friendly environment,” said student Dustin Reynolds, who will be part of the first class of paramedic graduates at the Pikeville Campus. “I’m looking forward to my classmates and me becoming a family over the next two years while we complete the program.”

“It was an awesome first day and open house to kick off the paramedic program,” said paramedic program director Cyrus Hess. “It was a great feeling to be able to introduce our new paramedic students to the emergency responder community and show off our new paramedic lab.”

A- Students and faculty of the new paramedic program at the Pikeville Campus participated in the open house event. (Back row, left to right) Bill Baker, Doug Tackett, Dwayne Osborne, Terry Music, Shane Dingus, Cyrus Hess, and Dr. Scott Akers; (seated, left to right) Dustin Reynolds, Mercedes Gooslin, Jordan Sparkman, and Tracy Daniels.

B- Area first responders attended the open house in support of the new paramedic program.


SOUTH BEND
Speaker Shares Past and Present Vision for U.S. Constitution

Speaker Shares Past and Present Vision for U.S. Constitution

Lt. Colonel Kent A. Laudeman was invited to be a guest speaker to address South Bend Campus staff, faculty, and students on Sept. 16 in recognition of Constitution Day. He is the current director of the Robert L. Miler Homeless Veteran’s Center and former vice dean for administration at the United States Military Academy.

Lt. Colonel Laudeman presented on the topic, “What was the Founders’ Original Intent?” He spoke of the historical context, as well as modern daily references in the news relating to the U.S. Constitution and its amendments. Lt. Colonel Laudeman reminded students that the Constitution holds the potential for change through amendments. “Although history is on the side of the 2nd Amendment, it does not fit now,” he offered as an example. “Maybe we are due to change the Amendment with just one word: the responsible right of the people to keep and bear arms.”

“His message was enlightening, especially coming from someone who has been in the military much longer than I have,” stated student Henry Bradley. “The Colonel discussed items stated in the Constitution that are happening and relevant today. He brought a lot of things to light, and I thank him for that,” added student Emerson Williams.

“His message was enlightening, especially coming from someone who has been in the military much longer than I have.”

Following Lt. Colonel Laudeman’s presentation, the student and faculty veterans in the audience were recognized and thanked for serving our country. Everyone in attendance was asked to stand and repeat the oath that is taken by those inducted into the armed services, which begins, “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.”    

Students Henry Bradley (far left), Krystal Domingo (2nd from left),  and Emerson Williams (far right) enjoyed hearing guest speaker Lt. Colonel Kent Laudeman’s (2nd from right) perspective on the U.S. Constitution.


LOUISVILLE
Cosmetologists Give Back While Continuing Their Education at ANU

Cosmetologists Give Back While Continuing Their Education at ANU

Rhonda Kelly and Lawanna McElroy, two licensed cosmetologists who are continuing their education at the Louisville Campus, recently partnered with the student activities committee (SAC) to hold a “Pamper Me Day,” offering  manicures and pedicures, eyebrow arching, eyelash applications, hand massages, hair styling, facials, and more free of charge to students.

“I love what I do and I love to make people happy,” said Lawanna, who enrolled at ANU to continue her quest for self-improvement after earning her GED and cosmetology license. After graduating from her business administration-management degree program she plans to one day manage a business or her own salon.

“We work hard here and we all need a moment to reflect and sit back and get pampered sometimes.”

Rhonda, a student in the medical assisting program, came to ANU after working as a licensed nail technician for over 20 years. “I knew that I needed something more career-based with more benefits. I have a child to raise,” she stated.  “So I decided [since] I like people and doing nails is hands-on, I could go into the medical field.”

Rhonda first attended a community college, but soon made the switch to ANU. “With me being 40-plus years old going back [to school], I wanted more of the one-on-one [instruction], smaller classes, and something [that would take me] more directly into the field that I wanted to go into,” she shared.

Both Rhonda and Lawanna enjoyed the opportunity to give back to their fellow students. “We work hard here and we all need a moment to reflect and sit back and get pampered sometimes,” explained Rhonda. “If I can give someone a pampering for free, and make them smile when they open their book tomorrow and see their nails, that makes me feel good.”

A- Licensed cosmetologist Lawanna McElroy, shown applying eyelash extensions during the “Pamper Me Day” at the Louisville Campus, is continuing her education in the business administration-management program at ANU.

B- Rhonda Kelly worked as a licensed nail technician for over 20 years before coming to ANU to train for a career in the medical field.


 
The National News is a biweekly publication designed to share the success and academic accomplishments of students and graduates from American National University and National College. For more information, contact the Communications Department.

In accordance with the regulations of the Tennessee Higher Education Council, all references to "American National University" refer to "National College" in the state of Tennessee.