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January 05, 2015


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SPOTLIGHT ON SUCCESS

Urgent Care Center Hires ANU Medical Assistants

Urgent Care Center Hires ANU Medical Assistants

South Bend campus director Tina Bonne and career center director Mary Mathews recently presented American National University’s Distinguished Community Employer award to Beacon’s Med Point Urgent Care. Office supervisor Kathy Schmitt accepted the award on behalf of the urgent care center, which recently hired two full-time American National University medical assisting graduates, LeToya Bradshaw and Chereka Fox.

Beacon Health Systems require that newly hired medical assistants have successfully completed a strong externship program, preferably within the Beacon system, and have passed the national Registered Medical Assistant exam, both of which are markers of American National University’s medical assisting program. “American National University’s demanding curriculum and challenging instructors prepare them well for the medical field,” stated Ms. Schmitt. “The American National University education is solid.”

She shared that American National University graduates come in prepared to do the work and are equipped with the knowledge of what will be expected as Beacon employees. Although the clinical skills are very important, soft skills can be just as significant, and American National University medical assisting graduates who are employed at the practice have had their customer service skills and sincerity praised by staff and patients alike. “Having a passion to provide professional and personal care is a must at Beacon,” stated Ms. Schmitt. 

She further noted that she does not always receive direct feedback from the physicians, but the first American National University graduate they hired was quickly noticed, promoted, and specifically chosen by a network physician to work with his group. Ms. Schmitt hopes to have other top American National University medical assisting graduates on board in the future.  

South Bend campus director Tina Bonne (left) and career center director Mary Mathews (right) present the Distinguished Community Employer award to Beacon’s Med Point Urgent Care office supervisor Kathy Schmitt. 

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Indiana
Fort Wayne, IN
Indianapolis, IN
South Bend, IN

Kentucky
Danville, KY
Florence, KY
Lexington, KY
Louisville, KY
Pikeville, KY
Richmond, KY

Ohio
Akron Area, OH
Cleveland, OH
Cincinnati, OH
Columbus, OH
Dayton Area, OH
Stark County, OH
Youngstown, OH

Tennessee
Bartlett, TN
Bristol, TN
Knoxville, TN
Madison, TN
Memphis, TN
Nashville, TN

Virginia
Charlottesville, VA
Danville, VA
Harrisonburg, VA
Lynchburg, VA
Manassas, VA
Martinsville, VA
Roanoke Valley, VA

West Virginia
Parkersburg, WV
Princeton, WV

CHARLOTTESVILLE
Charlottesville Campus Celebrates Information Technology and Computer Science Education Week

Charlottesville Campus Celebrates Information Technology and Computer Science Education Week

The Charlottesville Campus kicked off Information Technology and Computer Science Education Week with a presentation by Chip Taylor, senior system engineer for P. J. Networks in Charlottesville. An audience of students, faculty, and staff members listened as Mr. Taylor highlighted the evolution of computer security, discussed the importance of computer data security for individual and business networks and users, and explained current trends in malware (malicious software), viruses, rootkits, and other threats which raise the concern of data breaches.  

Mr. Taylor stressed that with over 80,000 new malware threats every day, the importance of having the right type of anti-virus software and keeping these protections regularly updated is essential. He also reminded the audience that because IT users rely on social media and other types of data downloads such as music and video, there should be a heightened awareness of data security.

Chip Taylor (4th from left), senior system engineer for P. J. Networks, spoke to the Charlottesville Campus for Information Technology and Computer Science Education Week.


HARRISONBURG
Student Selected for Externship Opportunity

Student Selected for Externship Opportunity

Goodwill Industries of the Valleys has been a destination for shoppers in Harrisonburg, Virginia since 2000, but the organization has served the citizens of this part of Virginia since 1931. With their recent move to a new location earlier this year, a career center was incorporated into the retail facility.  

Bonnie Libassi, the manager of Goodwill’s Career Connection Center, reached out to ANU this fall with a request for an extern to assist with various operational aspects of the career center. Coincidentally, Lydell Lockett, a business management student at the Harrisonburg Campus, was reaching the end of his associate’s degree program and was looking for just such an externship opportunity. Campus director David Zimmerman collaborated with the campus’s business programs chair, Larry Davis, and the connection between Lydell and Ms. Libassi was made!  

Externship experience is a component of many degree programs at ANU, and during the winter term, Lydell will be using his externship to assist Ms. Libassi and learn on-the-job what it takes to run such an operation. “I had not considered human resources as one of my professional goals, but this opportunity has changed that,” explained Lydell. “This has brought together all of the classroom information I have learned during my time at ANU and will prepare me for my career in management, which would not have been possible without my education at ANU!”

Business programs chair Larry Davis (right) helped coordinate an externship opportunity for business management student Lydell Lockett (center) working with Bonnie Libassi (left) at Goodwill’s Career Connection Center.


PRINCETON
Medical Assisting Student Feels Options Are Endless In the Medical Field

Medical Assisting Student Feels Options Are Endless In the Medical Field

Sara Nelson came to the Princeton Campus in search of training for a new career after ANU was recommended to her by her brother and a friend who were graduates. “When I came to visit ANU, the environment was so wonderful; everyone was so very kind and courteous,” recalled Sara. “They made me feel like this is not going to be an overwhelming thing—we’re going to help you step-by-step to get there. That was very appealing to me, because people don’t take time to be courteous like that nowadays.” 

With an inclination toward the medical field, she enrolled in the medical assisting program, where her instructors continued to nurture her. “I think the instructors that we have managing these programs make all the difference,” she explained. “You can take a field that people love and ruin it; or you can take people that care, and are genuinely excited to see you learn, and then it just all clicks.”

In addition to the hands-on training that she receives in the classroom, Sara is also putting her administrative skills to use working as a federal work study at the campus. “I’ve taken skills from my time as a work study that I know I will use for the rest of my life,” she stated.

After completing her medical assisting program next term, Sara plans to continue her education in the medical billing and coding program at the Princeton Campus. She feels that her options are endless as she prepares to enter the medical field. “I think it’s going to open up doors—doors I wouldn’t have had opened otherwise,” she said of her education. “When you’re in the medical field, you can go anywhere with it and do anything you want. I just want to keep learning.”

A-Sara Nelson is equally passionate about the clinical and administrative aspects of her medical assisting program.

B-Sara has gained valuable administrative experience working as a federal work study student at the Princeton Campus.


LYNCHBURG
Lynchburg Campus Honors Regional Cancer Center for Supporting Career Training

Lynchburg Campus Honors Regional Cancer Center for Supporting Career Training

Centra Alan B. Pearson Regional Cancer Center was awarded the Distinguished Community Employer Award for their partnership with American National University’s Lynchburg Campus in providing employment opportunities for graduates and offering externship sites for medical assisting students. The award was presented to Curt Baker, vice president of Centra Alan B. Pearson Regional Cancer Center, by director of health care education Sue Coleman and career center director Stephanie Anastasio.

Kara Lamb, oncology nurse navigator and former ANU instructor, and Anita Lowe, cancer services community liaison, also participated in the presentation. “ANU grads have been a great asset to our cancer registry at the Pearson Cancer Center,” said Ms. Lamb. “We’re fortunate to have them as a part of our team!” Ms. Lowe added that ANU’s students are great to work with and the education and experience they arrive with are well-suited to the positions they fill. There are currently two ANU medical assisting graduates employed by the center, and one medical assisting student volunteers her time.   

Whether it’s volunteering or medical assisting, the broad area of need that many of our graduates qualify to assist in makes the partnership between the campus and Alan B. Pearson a win-win for all.

Oncology nurse navigator Kara Lamb (far left) and vice president Curt Baker (second from right) accept the Distinguished Community Employer award on behalf of Centra Alan B. Pearson Regional Cancer Center from Lynchburg Campus director of health care education Sue Coleman (second from left) and career center director Stephanie Anastasio (far right).


DAYTON AREA
William Furay - Surgical Technology Instructor and Clinical Coordinator - Dayton Area Campus

William Furay - Surgical Technology Instructor and Clinical Coordinator - Dayton Area Campus

WHO:

William Furay – Difference Maker at the Dayton Area Campus

WHAT:

Instructor and clinical coordinator for the surgical technology program

Certified Surgical Technologist (CST)

WHEN:

American National University instructor since 2006

Has acquired more than 27 years of experience as a surgical technician

WHERE:

U.S. Navy veteran

WHY:

“My mother was a nurse, and I thought I would follow her, but I went into the Navy and into the surgical technology program and could not get enough.
 

“I challenge my students by answering their questions with a question. It’s too easy to give them the answers; they must be able to think on their feet in this profession. I admire their fortitude in pressing ahead when I present them with a challenge in the lab setting. 
 

“My greatest rewards as an instructor come when our students pass their national CST exam and are hired at their clinical rotation sites.”
 

Dayton Area Campus surgical technology instructor and clinical coordinator William Furay is pictured in the surgical technology lab with student Mary Layton.


FLORENCE
Graduate Hired after Proving Herself to Employer during Clinical Rotations

Graduate Hired after Proving Herself to Employer during Clinical Rotations

Clinical rotations are a key component of each surgical technology student’s program at American National University, providing a hands-on experience in the operating room that no textbook could replicate. Clinicals also provide an unparalleled opportunity for an upcoming graduate to prove themselves to a potential employer, as did Florence Campus graduate Diana Fahey, who performed part of her clinical rotation at Advanced Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center and was recently hired by the practice after impressing clinical director Vanessa Hinsdale with her skills and strong work ethic.

“You have to make that impression when you’re in your location,” said Vanessa, also a American National University graduate, who now supervises students during their clinicals at the practice. “All of us that work here [who graduated] from National did some part of our training here. [At National, they] always stress in class that you treat your clinical site and your externship as if they’re a job.”

At Advanced Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center, Diana serves as a first assistant to the surgeons, working by their side in the operating room as they perform rhinoplasty, face lifts, tummy tucks, liposuction, chin implants, and other procedures. She also assists in recovery and during post-operative consults, as well as with instrument sterilization.

Diana first enrolled at American National University in 2006, but was temporarily sidetracked from her program when she took some time off after her son was born. Determined to get her degree, she returned to American National University in 2013, and picked up where she left off. She studied hard and made every effort to become the best surgical technologist possible, proving herself not only during her externship, but also by passing the exam to become certified in her field. Although Diana has had some setbacks along the way, she’s proud that she persevered and accomplished her dream of working in the OR.   

I’m a single mom; I did it by myself. I’m very proud of that,” said Diana. “It was a lot of hard work, and it finally paid off.”

A-- Florence Campus graduate Diana Fayhey became certified as a surgical technologist and was hired by Advanced Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center after performing part of her clinical rotations in the practice.
 

B-- Diana Fayhey (center) is shown with fellow American National University alum Vanessa Hinsdale (left), who now works as clinical director of Advanced Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center, and double board certified surgeon, Dr. Jon Mendelsohn (right).


RICHMOND
Graduate Returns to National to Further Her Education in the Medical Field

Graduate Returns to National to Further Her Education in the Medical Field

Arkie Rogers earned her medical office specialist diploma at the Richmond Campus in 2009 and recently returned to American National University to further her education in the medical assisting and medical billing and coding programs.

While she is using her training in a local medical practice, she feels that expanding her skills will make her even more valuable to her employer and will increase her opportunities for advancement in the future. “I talked to the doctor that I’m working for, and she’s looking for somebody that can rotate if multiple people have to be out of the office,” explained Arkie. “She’s really excited that I’m there, because she knows that I can do more than just the billing and coding, or just the receptionist [position].”

Arkie feels that American National University has become a second home to her. The staff and faculty are always available to assist her in any way that they can to see that her career goals become a reality. “American National University – they’ve changed my life tremendously. They’ve been the family that I’ve needed for that extra push,” she stated. “The degrees that I’m accomplishing are going to better my future and give me a bigger window of what I am able to do. It’s given me the opportunity to show, not only myself, but my son and my family that if you put your mind to it, great things come out of it.”

Arkie Rogers returned to American National University to further her education in the medical field after earning her diploma in the medical office specialist program in 2009.


DANVILLE, KENTUCKY
Students Practice Emergency Medical Care during Mock Disaster

Students Practice Emergency Medical Care during Mock Disaster

Students in Stephanie Slone’s Non-Invasive Clinical Procedures class at the Danville, Kentucky Campus recently participated in a mock disaster to test their emergency medical care skills and their ability to think and react quickly. The students acted as first responders and were not aware of what they would find when they arrived at the scene of the “disaster.” The scenario involved the aftermath of a tornado hit, and “victims,” portrayed by Jennifer Lyon’s Systems of Transport and Transport Support class, were scattered about the classrooms. Some of the portrayed victims were in very serious condition, and unfortunately some were already beyond lifesaving.

Both the students who provided medical treatment and those who portrayed victims found the experience to be fun and informative. “It was an educational experience that helped me better understand and relate to a possible disaster,” said medical assisting student Kayla Stubblefield. 

“It was such a blast!” added Tayler Lawson, who also portrayed a first responder. “It definitely put me in the mood to go save some lives in a disaster. It was a great learning experience and adrenaline rush!”

Student Halie Frye portrayed a victim with a broken femur. “It was really fun, and I look forward to having [Stephanie’s] class in the future,” she commented.

A– Medical assisting student Ciera Clements is shown taking the pulse of “victim” Gary Roller during the mock disaster at the Danville, Kentucky Campus.
 

B – Student “victim” Eric Davis receives first aid from medical assisting student Kayla Stubblefield during the natural disaster scenario.


LOUISVILLE
Personalized Attention from Instructors Gives Graduate Confidence to Enter Corporate World

 Personalized Attention from Instructors Gives Graduate Confidence to Enter Corporate World

U.S. Army veteran John McKanney enrolled at the Louisville Campus using his Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits because he knew that he needed a college degree to help him transition into a civilian career, but he was nervous about returning to school. With the support of his instructors, John earned his associate’s degree in business administration-management, and he has launched his business career working at Humana as a Medicare enrollment specialist.

“It started rocky, but when I really got into school, I had the greatest teachers of them all; the teachers that I was surrounded with were the best,” explained John, who named business department chairman Theosious Fuqua and business instructor Luis Alicea-Batlle as two of his most influential instructors.  

Throughout his program, Theosious was always available to meet with John whenever he needed help, and Luis inspired his impeccable professional dress, explaining that they compete each day to see who can dress the best, right down to their color-coordinating socks.

John said everything that he’s learned in his business classes helped him land his job with Humana. He is continuing his education to earn his bachelor’s degree at the Louisville Campus, and he looks forward to working with his instructors to gain even more in-depth knowledge of the business world.

A– John McKanney, a veteran who is a student in the business administration-management program at the Louisville Campus, is working as an enrollment specialist at Humana.

B- McKanney and business instructor Luis Alicea-Batlle compare their fashionable socks.


PIKEVILLE
Campus Holds Social Media Workshop

Campus Holds Social Media Workshop

The Pikeville Campus recently held a social media workshop that was open for students, as well as community members, to learn how they could use social media both personally and professionally.  

The workshop was led by American National University’s communications manager Jill Sluss and social media manager Kate Stackpole, who are based out of the campus support center in Roanoke, Virginia.  

During their presentation, Jill and Kate explained the impact that social media makes on a local and global level. The variety of uses for Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter were discussed, such as connecting with former or current classmates and business associates for networking purposes.  The presentation also emphasized that social media is a great tool for searching and applying for positions within one’s community. Jill shared with the group how connections made through Facebook helped shape her own career, and Kate stressed how local businesses can connect with potential customers on social media and hold contests to increase their level of engagement.  

“I was so happy that I attended,” said Julie Wilson of Friends of Coal, a local non-profit organization. “[I learned] several things and that is always a plus. I love meeting new people who are so nice and have compassion to help others.”

Community members and current students learn about social media at a workshop led by American National University’s communications manager Jill Sluss and social media manager Kate Stackpole.


 
The National News is a biweekly publication designed to share the success and academic accomplishments of students and graduates from American National University and National College. For more information, contact the Communications Department.

In accordance with the regulations of the Tennessee Higher Education Council, all references to "American National University" refer to "National College" in the state of Tennessee.